ssf logo blue Rötter - din källa för släktforskning driven av Sveriges Släktforskarförbund
ssf logo blue Rötter - din källa för släktforskning

Choose language:
Anbytarforum

Innehållet i inläggen på Anbytarforum omfattas inte av utgivningsbeviset för rotter.se

Författare Ämne: Äldre inlägg (arkiv) till 2005-09-11  (läst 1493 gånger)

2005-07-23, 19:54
läst 1493 gånger

Utloggad Charles LaVine

  • Anbytare ***
  • Antal inlägg: 216
  • Senast inloggad: 2017-11-16, 16:53
    • Visa profil
Need translation of the phrase “Att lantens wågor”. Written by a 50 year old Värmlänning in 1862.
 
Also of the following which could be misspellings: “runnade” and “uppleratt”
 
Charles LaVine

2005-07-23, 20:45
Svar #1

Utloggad Olle Andersson

  • Anbytare *****
  • Antal inlägg: 1081
  • Senast inloggad: 2019-03-22, 19:32
    • Visa profil
Charles!
 
The first in modern swedish may read Atlantens vågor and that is the waves of the Atlantic.
 
The other words are difficult as separate items. If possible, submit the full sentences.
 
Olle

2005-07-23, 20:56
Svar #2

Utloggad Berit Tjernberg

  • Anbytare *****
  • Antal inlägg: 2255
  • Senast inloggad: 2021-05-06, 00:20
    • Visa profil
Charles,
Att lantens wågor : waves of the Atlantic Ocean
 
Perhaps you could write the whole sentence with the other words runnade and uppleratt, so it will be easier to understand the meaning.
 
Kind regards
Berit
 
(Perhaps someone else could help also)

2005-07-24, 00:29
Svar #3

Utloggad Ann Little

  • Anbytare *****
  • Antal inlägg: 1252
  • Senast inloggad: 2020-08-08, 20:32
    • Visa profil
Hi Charles,
 
Perhaps 'uppleratt' should be 'upplevat'( upplevt)= experienced. Maybe the word 'runnade' has lost a 'g' and should be ' grunnade', which means you are thinking something over or thinking deeply.
 
Regards,
Ann

2005-07-24, 14:34
Svar #4

Utloggad Eva Svensson

  • Anbytare ****
  • Antal inlägg: 970
  • Senast inloggad: 2021-07-06, 20:18
    • Visa profil
Charles, I think it will be easier if you put in the whole swedish sentences -then you can guess what the missing word/words are.
It is always much easier to have have the whole sentence when you are trying to translate from swedish into english -and vice versa!

2005-07-25, 19:46
Svar #5

Utloggad Britt Börjesson

  • Anbytare ***
  • Antal inlägg: 396
  • Senast inloggad: 2021-07-06, 14:42
    • Visa profil
Runnade is a typical swenglish word - it's the word run (as run a business, run a farm) with swedish ending indicating past time. Does that fit into the context?

2005-07-25, 20:47
Svar #6

Utloggad Elisabet Arvidsson

  • Anbytare *****
  • Antal inlägg: 1483
  • Senast inloggad: 2021-02-18, 20:56
    • Visa profil
Charles!
Are the letter written when they was on the chip?
Does the letter describe how the waves was so high that all the things on the chip rämnades -- rolling around the chip in the water and some of the thing get lost in the  sea, even the boat can rämnade -- rolling in the waves but not get around so they all was alive...?
I'm not good in english but I hope you understand me.
I just guess.
Good luck to the translating.
The two first word I agree with Atlantic Waves
and upplevat as Ann has describe it.
Elisabet

2005-07-28, 03:08
Svar #7

Charles J. LaVine

Dear responders:
 
You have asked how the word “runnade” has been used, specifically in a sentence/phrase. The author of the diary has used it twice, this being one example:
 
På detta afvstånd fingo rebellarne wår andra salva som gjorde många till gräsryttare och twång dem till en hastig reträit med undantag af en sqvadron som runnade wår westra flygal emellan densamma och kanonerne.  
 
Note the use of runnade in the above.
 
I need a translation of the same.
 
As to the phrase “Att vanten Wågar”, “Atlantic's waves” does not work. Roos has long since crossed the Atlantic.
 
He was remember his days of youth and all of the young ladies he had know, and rejected because of his “first love” and judging all others against her.  
 
I was wondering if it was a unique Värmland expression. “wåga” is also a verb. So I would suspect the expression is “To “lanten's” ventures”.
 
Still need your help.
 
Charles.

2005-07-28, 03:24
Svar #8

Utloggad Charles LaVine

  • Anbytare ***
  • Antal inlägg: 216
  • Senast inloggad: 2017-11-16, 16:53
    • Visa profil
I should give you all some idea of what the diary is about. It is the Civil War diary of a Swedish-American soldier in Company D, of the 3rd Minnesota Regiment. Company D was recruited by Hans Mattson from Swedish and Norwegian emmigrants in Minnesota. Mattson, who had been trained at the Kristinanstad's Arillery School and served in the Swedish Army before he emigrated to America, later became the regiment's commander and then became possibly the most important Swede in post Civil War politics and government in Minnesota and a principal recruiter of Swedish emigrants to Minnesota in the 1870-1880s.
 
Roos' diary can be of historical significance as the only day by day account of this regiment, whose claim to infamy is that it was essentially bluffed into surrender to an inferior force at Murfreesboro,  by a vote of its officers. It yet went on to serve with distinction.
 
Charles
 
PS: I can probably be return for futher help as there are five or six more sections of his diary that I must translate, having done 4 todate.
 
Charles

2005-07-28, 08:55
Svar #9

Annika Lidén

Charles!
 
The word runnade must be rundade = went around.
Att vanten wågar is mabe a mix of language, to want to dare.
Annika

2005-07-28, 10:48
Svar #10

Utloggad Ann Little

  • Anbytare *****
  • Antal inlägg: 1252
  • Senast inloggad: 2020-08-08, 20:32
    • Visa profil
Charles! I actually think 'runnade' means'rammed' or 'ran into'
 
At this distance the rebels received our second salvo that changed them into 'grass riders'*
and forced them into a hasty retreat with the exception of one squadron which rammed our west wing between it and the canons.
 
* I have no idea what grass riders means I'm afraid.
 
Kind regards,
Ann

2005-07-28, 11:06
Svar #11

Utloggad Ann Little

  • Anbytare *****
  • Antal inlägg: 1252
  • Senast inloggad: 2020-08-08, 20:32
    • Visa profil
Correction of  that changed them into....; it should read  that turned many  into  .....

2005-07-28, 16:48
Svar #12

Utloggad Jeff Benson

  • Anbytare ***
  • Antal inlägg: 153
  • Senast inloggad: 2020-05-12, 03:22
    • Visa profil
'Grass riders' sounds to me like some sort of soldier slang or euphemism for 'casualties'. In other words, '... our second salvo left many lying in the grass, dead or wounded.' That is just a guess, however.
 
Charles, what was the soldier's full name? You have only mentioned his surname, Roos. I have some ancestors named Roos in my tree (very far back). These Roos were part of a noble family, many of whom lived in Värmland.
 
Jeff

2005-07-28, 18:09
Svar #13

Utloggad Ann Little

  • Anbytare *****
  • Antal inlägg: 1252
  • Senast inloggad: 2020-08-08, 20:32
    • Visa profil
Jeff, I think you may be right, and it did occur to me also whilst discussing this rather odd expression with someone else earlier today.
However, maybe one should substitute 'grass' for 'turf' and call them turf riders? In England, a bookmaker ( in horse racing) is also known as a turf accountant.  
 
Ann

2005-07-28, 19:26
Svar #14

Magnus Andersson

When you read the phrase, and it says På detta afvstånd fingo rebellarne wår andra salva som gjorde många till gräsryttare  It must mean On this distace the rebels got our second shot, and many of them become grassriders. Grassrider=Cavallerist that loose he?s horse. continue the fight walking/running on the ground/grass

2005-08-07, 17:44
Svar #15

Utloggad Charles LaVine

  • Anbytare ***
  • Antal inlägg: 216
  • Senast inloggad: 2017-11-16, 16:53
    • Visa profil
Need some more translation help. How does one translate the capitalized word in the following phrase:
 
“General Nelson kom hit under wår rastning vid stationen och HUNDSWATTERADE oss för att wi icke arresterat wåra officera och slagit på egen hand.”
 
The context is that shortly after the Minnesota 3rd Infantry had been surrendered, ignominiously, to the Confederate General Forest at Murfreesboro, the enlisted men were paroled (set free on their promise to not take up arms again). Nelson was the commanding general for the theater of operations and had returned with Union forces and retaken the city.
 
Charles LaVine

2005-08-07, 18:44
Svar #16

Utloggad Maud Svensson

  • Anbytare *****
  • Antal inlägg: 19030
  • Senast inloggad: 2021-07-24, 16:17
    • Visa profil
Hundsfottera/hundsvottera = insult/offend/outrage/affront
 
It is a very old word, hardly used nowadays. Hundsfott/hundsvott was an abusive word, meaning that someone was a wretch/weakling, but the word actually refers to the genitals of a bitch.
Hälsar vänligen
Maud

2005-08-08, 12:11
Svar #17

Utloggad Heikki Särkkä

  • Anbytare *****
  • Antal inlägg: 2200
  • Senast inloggad: 2019-09-02, 15:00
    • Visa profil
Är inte hundsvott ett tyskt lånord i svenska (och senare i finska)?

2005-08-08, 12:56
Svar #18

Utloggad Rolf Liljhammar

  • Anbytare ***
  • Antal inlägg: 466
  • Senast inloggad: 2010-12-03, 04:58
    • Visa profil
Heikki!
Rätt påpekat.  
I Ordbok till Fredmans Epitlar står:
Hundsfott (Jergen Puckels språk /tyska/)skällsord med grovt nedsättande, urspr skabrös innebörd.
/Ordet förekommer i Ep 33:47 och 76:40/
 
I Tysk-Svensk Ordbok, Norsteds 1959:
Hunds/fötterei: nedrighet, kanaljeri, skurkstreck.
 
Det var litet stuns i skällsorden förr i tiden.
 
Mvh
 
Rolf L

2005-08-09, 01:12
Svar #19

Hasse Svedberg

Hur förklarar man sjötermen hunsvott eller ibland skriven hundsvott?

2005-08-09, 01:54
Svar #20

Utloggad Maud Svensson

  • Anbytare *****
  • Antal inlägg: 19030
  • Senast inloggad: 2021-07-24, 16:17
    • Visa profil
Förklaringen är att blocket genom sin form lett tanken till de yttre könsdelarna hos hynda, enligt SAOB.
Av samma anledning kallas också ett litet baksäte för körsvennen å kappsläde (urspr. av rundat trekantig form) för hundsvott.
I Finland hade (eller har kanske fortfarande?)  ett bakverk detta föga aptitretande namn...
Hälsar vänligen
Maud

2005-08-13, 16:57
Svar #21

Utloggad Charles LaVine

  • Anbytare ***
  • Antal inlägg: 216
  • Senast inloggad: 2017-11-16, 16:53
    • Visa profil
To Jeff Benson
 
Carl Roos' name,date and place of birth according to him is:
 
I was born at Långbanshytten  in the Filipstad bergslag (sic)  on the 24th of August 1802 .night before a Saturday bell .. in the middle of the spirits' hour
 
To Maude and the others and to all of you thanks. Upon re-examining Roos' original words, he did write HUNDSVOTTERADE. His S can be rather slavig and the s and the v seemed to make a w.
 
IN our current idiom and as a soldier in the ranks and putting it politly, the General chewed our butts out which does make the sentance and the sense.
 
Mvh,
 
Charles

2005-08-22, 17:48
Svar #22

Utloggad Charles LaVine

  • Anbytare ***
  • Antal inlägg: 216
  • Senast inloggad: 2017-11-16, 16:53
    • Visa profil
I am suspecting the the word in capitals could be Swinglish but if not, I need a translation of the same. This is the phrase where it appears:  
 
Camperade vid Little Chippawa Lake. Så väl skogen som prairiena äro tätt SPEXKARLE med småa sjöar.
 
The English word speckled would fit the sentance sense.
 
Mvh,
 
Charles

2005-08-22, 18:32
Svar #23

Utloggad Jöran Johansson

  • Anbytare ****
  • Antal inlägg: 620
  • Senast inloggad: 2016-11-08, 16:57
    • Visa profil
    • www.banvakt.se
The word seems to be SPECKADE (today spelt späckade). Späckad means larded, späckade is the plural form.
 
Regards
Jöran Johansson

2005-08-22, 19:34
Svar #24

Utloggad Elisabeth Thorsell

  • Anbytare *****
  • Antal inlägg: 9207
  • Senast inloggad: 2021-07-21, 15:10
    • Visa profil
    • www.etgenealogy.se
And you might translate it as filled with little lakes.

2005-08-22, 20:07
Svar #25

Utloggad Ann Little

  • Anbytare *****
  • Antal inlägg: 1252
  • Senast inloggad: 2020-08-08, 20:32
    • Visa profil
Charles,I think the sentence should read; ' the woods* as well as the praries are (closeley) speckled with little lakes'.
 
Kind regards,
Ann Little
 
 
* or forests

2005-09-10, 17:50
Svar #26

Utloggad Charles LaVine

  • Anbytare ***
  • Antal inlägg: 216
  • Senast inloggad: 2017-11-16, 16:53
    • Visa profil
To all:
 
Thanks for the previous help. “Speckled” fits the sentence sense and the story sense.
 
I now have two more words that I am puzzling over. I actually believe that they can be “Swinglish”. The words in question are in capitals. The phrases/sentences they are used in are:  
 
Kavalleriet bestod blott af 40 man och de HISITERADE att genskjuta fiender invid rivern.
 
and  
 
Garnisjonen voro höght glada såsom de INMAGINERAD att de voro död.
 
The first could be the English word “hesitated” and the second could be “imagined”
 
Your Swedish insight would be much appreciated.
 
Tack i förwäg.
 
Mvh,
 
Charles LaVine

2005-09-10, 18:58
Svar #27

Utloggad Ann Little

  • Anbytare *****
  • Antal inlägg: 1252
  • Senast inloggad: 2020-08-08, 20:32
    • Visa profil
Hi Charles,
 
Yes, I agree with 'hestitated' and 'imagined'. However, the word 'död' at the end of the second sentence, ought to be 'döda', the plural form of 'död'.
 
 
Ann

2005-09-10, 19:20
Svar #28

Utloggad Maud Svensson

  • Anbytare *****
  • Antal inlägg: 19030
  • Senast inloggad: 2021-07-24, 16:17
    • Visa profil
The Swedish verbs are hesitera and imaginera, not very often used nowadays.
Hälsar vänligen
Maud

2005-09-11, 11:01
Svar #29

Utloggad Anna-Carin Betzén

  • Anbytare *****
  • Antal inlägg: 1112
  • Senast inloggad: 2019-10-28, 20:07
    • Visa profil
    • www.btz.se
Charles,  
 
These words are found in French and Latin too, both of which have had a large influence on the Swedish (and English!) language in the past.

Innehållet i inläggen på Anbytarforum omfattas inte av utgivningsbeviset för rotter.se


Annonser






Marknaden

elgenstierna utan-bakgrund 270pxKöp och Sälj

Här kan du köpa eller sälja vidare böcker och andra produkter som är släktforskaren till hjälp.

Se de senast inlagda annonserna